(From page 2 , here is further information on the effects of an over-intense brain) :

(a) How brain OverIntensity can cause more Own World orientation
If you are more strongly autistic than most, your brain may be more intense-overall, thinking thoughts at a million-miles-an-hour-faster than the less-autistic brain. That intensity demands more of your own attention, and focuses it away from attending to other people, resulting in being more in Own World. This  trait is commonly seen in the very-mild autistic condition (because the self-absorption it creates  does not necessarily result in as frequent retreat to Own World as we observe in the more-autistic among us.)

(b) How an unevenly-intense brain can cause Confusion:
The process of thought, the constructing of logical explanations for what is happening around one, involves interaction between
many parts of the brain: observation via one part of the brain, passing those observations to another part for interpretation, handing all that over to another part to balance such new inputs against past experiences to obtain context, and so forth. If an OverSensitive (which means more intense) part of your brain contributes a stronger message to the other parts of the brain than they were “expecting”, then the total message might get confused.

To provide an example: if you were reading a section of text and bits

of

it were

strongly bolded

for no apparent reason

you might come

away

with confusion about the total message, a loss of cohesion as to what the total message meant. As a result, you might focus on the more strongly-underlined aspects of your message rather than its totality, and this phenomenon is a commonly-observed trait in the more-autistic person.

To conclude, Confusion is a vicious circle driving the more-autistic person even further into Own World. Once there more frequently, misinterpretation as to what is going on in the Real World is even more likely.

Note however that although a proportion of a more-autistic person’s confusion may derive from brain “OverSensitivity-Imbalance” (as described above), I believe that most of the Confusion comes from the person being in “Own World” and trying to interpret “Real World” events from this perspective.

(The process is explored in the “You Experience Autism” sidebar under the title “Your Confusion”.)

I warmly encourage you to contribute your opinions to
my Website! If you click on this blue line here
you can make your opinion be known!